Bees, Flies, Moths And Wasps

PICK YOUR PEST

BEES

SPECIES

  • Bumble Bee (Bombus sp.)
  • Mason Bee (Osmia sp.)
  • Solitary Bee (Andrena Fulva)
  • Honey Bee (Apis Mellifera)

APPEARANCE

  • Length: 10 – 12mm
  • Thorax: Black with Yellow on its sides.
  • Abdomen: Yellow with Black bands.
  • Antennae: Black. Legs: Yellow.
  • 2 pairs of membranous wings.

HABITS & BEHAVIOUR

  • Common throughout Europe.
  • Usually nest in wall cavities, lofts, hollow trees and bushes.
  • Nests are made from wood (paper) which is chewed from trees, reeds or garden fences mixed with saliva.
  • They are produced each year and are set horizontally.
  • The colony size can be up to as many as 25,000 individuals with around 10,000 of these being workers.
  • They feed on fallen fruit, nectar and carrion, but mostly catching other insects.
  • Common wasps will also attempt to invade honey bee nests to steal their honey.

LIFE SPAN

  • Between 10 – 20 are laid in cells inside the nest.
  • Larvae – legless grubs are fed in the cells by workers on insects and spiders while the queen continues to lay eggs. These develop in around 4 weeks.
  • Up to a 1000 throughout the summer can be laid by the queen.
  • Pupae – these develop in about 2 weeks with in the cell. Once hatched the sterile female workers continue to help build the nest and feed the larvae.
  • Adults – Towards the end of the summer the queen lays more eggs which produce male wasps called drones and fertile females which will be the queens of next year’s nests. These swarm out of the colony and mate. The males die shortly afterwards. At the end of autumn the wasp nests die and the only wasps left alive are the young mated queens which hibernate for the winter. It is not uncommon to find hibernating queen bees in and around your home throughout the winter.

IMPORTANT

  • A sting may introduce a condition known as anaphylactic shock (an extreme reaction to the toxins in the wasps’ venom) which if not medically treated can result in death.
  • Their venom contains a pheromone which acts as an alarm causing other wasps to become more aggressive when a wasp has stung something or has been killed.
  • Do not try to block up the hole from the outside as this can trap and anger the wasps and lead to them trying to find a way out through your premises.
  • It is dangerous to swat a wasp near its nest site or to attempt to remove the nest yourself, as wasps can sting repeatedly.
  • Later in the season as larval rearing is reduced the adults search for sweeter substances.
  • Wasps also become more irritable as the cooler weather sets in

FLIES

SPECIES

There are around 6500 species of fly living in Britain. Fortunately the pesticides that are used for fly eradication cover all types and species. Various different techniques and time frames can be given for treatments but please feel free to contact our customer service staff who will be more than happy to explain the different services we offer. The following is a list of species of fly you are likely to encounter:

  • Filter fly
  • Bluebottle
  • Lesser house fly
  • Fruit fly
  • Horse Fly

APPEARANCE

  • Length: 5-8mm with a wingspan of around 13-15mm.
  • The thorax is grey with 4 dark stripes.
  • The abdomen is buff-coloured and occasionally transparent.
  • The larvae are white and taper to a point at the head end. 10 – 12mm long when mature.

LIFE SPAN

  • Adult life of 1-3 months she is capable of producing 4-5 batches of 100-150 eggs.
  • The eggs hatch in 8 – 48 hours, the maggot larvae burrow away from light, after 3 moults reach maturity at a length of 10-12mm.
  • The full cycle is generally completed between 1 and 4 weeks, depending upon temperature and food sources.
  • In warm environments houseflies remain active and reproduce throughout the year.

IMPORTANT

  • The adult fly transmits disease by contaminating food with disease organisms it has picked up on its hairy legs or has ingested and then regurgitated.
  • It is often a carrier of such diseases as typhoid fever, cholera, dysentery, trachoma, and anthrax.

HABITS & BEHAVIOUR

  • Found in almost all types of human habitations throughout the world.
  • Breeds in moist decaying food matter.
  • Taste-sensitive cells are located on its feet as well as on its mouthparts.

MOTHS

SPECIES

There are around 800 different types of moths across Britain, and 2400 species recorded in the British Isles. Fortunately the pesticides that are used for moth eradication cover all types and species. Various different techniques and time frames can be given for treatments but please feel free to contact our customer service staff who will be more than happy to explain the different services we offer. The following is a list of the species of moth you will be likely to encounter:

  • House Moth
  • Case-bearing Clothes Moth
  • White-shouldered House Moth
  • Indian Mill Moth
  • Tropical Warehouse Moth

APPEARANCE

  • Length: 4 – 7mm long overall.
  • Long thread like antennae, long legs with spines at joints.
  • Forewings are shiny golden with no markings. Trailing edge of the wings is strongly fringed.

LIFE SPAN

  • Eggs – are laid amongst fibres and fabrics. These will hatch at above 10°C in 1 – 5 weeks.
  • Larva – whitish caterpillars that form silk tunnels, camouflaged with fibres and debris. They leave the tunnels at night to feed and hide during the day. Development takes 2 – 7 months.
  • Pupae – inside last larval skin concealed in fabric. These develop from within 2 weeks – 2 months.
  • Adults – the female moth is quite sedentary, but the males do fly on occasions. Adults do not feed and are short lived.

IMPORTANT

At one time the common clothes moth was by far the most economically important clothing household pest in Britain, an estimated £12million worth of damage was caused by this one species alone.

HABITS & BEHAVIOUR

  • Attacks particularly textiles and animal products, for example wool, fur, silk, skins, feathers and leather.
  • As they avoid the light they are often found in old wardrobes and furniture.
  • Can also be found on clothes, carpets, curtains, sofas.

WASPS

SPECIES

  • Common Wasp (Vespula Vulgaris)
  • Garden Wasp (Vespula Germanica)

APPEARANCE

  • Length: 10 – 12mm
  • Thorax: Black with Yellow on its sides.
  • Abdomen: Yellow with Black bands.
  • Antennae: Black. Legs: Yellow.
  • 2 pairs of membranous wings.

HABITS & BEHAVIOUR

  • Common throughout Europe.
  • Usually nest in wall cavities, lofts, hollow trees and bushes.
  • Nests are made from wood (paper) which is chewed from trees, reeds or garden fences mixed with saliva.
  • They are produced each year and are set horizontally.
  • The colony size can be up to as many as 25,000 individuals with around 10,000 of these being workers.
  • They feed on fallen fruit, nectar and carrion, but mostly catching other insects.
  • Common wasps will also attempt to invade honey bee nests to steal their honey.

LIFE SPAN

  • Between 10 – 20 are laid in cells inside the nest.
  • Larvae – legless grubs are fed in the cells by workers on insects and spiders while the queen continues to lay eggs. These develop in around 4 weeks.
  • Up to a 1000 throughout the summer can be laid by the queen.
  • Pupae – these develop in about 2 weeks within the cell. Once hatched the sterile female workers continue to help build the nest and feed the larvae.
  • Adults – Towards the end of the summer the queen lays more eggs which produce male wasps called drones and fertile females which will be the queens of next year’s nests. These swarm out of the colony and mate. The males die shortly afterwards. At the end of autumn the wasp nests die and the only wasps left alive are the young mated queens which hibernate for the winter. It is not uncommon to find hibernating queen bees in and around your home throughout the winter.

IMPORTANT

  • A sting may introduce a condition known as anaphylactic shock (an extreme reaction to the toxins in the wasps’ venom) which if not medically treated can result in death.
  • Their venom contains a pheromone which acts as an alarm causing other wasps to become more aggressive when a wasp has stung something or has been killed.
  • Do not try to block up the hole from the outside as this can trap and anger the wasps and lead to them trying to find a way out through your premises.
  • It is dangerous to swat a wasp near its nest site or to attempt to remove the nest yourself, as wasps can sting repeatedly.
  • Later in the season as larval rearing is reduced the adults search for sweeter substances.
  • Wasps also become more irritable as the cooler weather sets in

GET IN TOUCH

Do you have a pest problem? We can help! Get in touch either using our from or our details below and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

0800 195 3464

Key West House,
17 Pinders Green Dr, Methley, Leeds LS26 9BA

 

info@keywestpestcontrol.co.uk

GET A FREE CALL OUT OR CALL BACK

LET US PROTECT YOUR HOME OR BUSINESS

At Key West Pest Control, we understand that both residential and commercial pest control issues need to be dealt with immediately in order for your home or business to continue running smoothly.

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BUSINESS HOURS

Monday - Friday:  8am - 7pm
Saturday: 9am - 5pm
Sunday: Closed

GET IN TOUCH

0800 195 3464 (Local Rate)
01977 515000 
info@keywestpestcontrol.co.uk